Expertise documents

expertise_documents

Specific Inactivated Yeast enriched in Glutathione

The utilization of specialty inactivated yeasts (SIY) in winemaking has gained popularity in recent years, and their uses are varied. For example, SIY can be used as protectors during yeast rehydration and as a nutrition tool during fermentation. As we understand more about the yeast cell constituents, the production process, the characterization of each yeast strain and their unique fractions, we can obtain very specialized inactivated yeasts to yield specific results under defined conditions. Such is the case for the inactivated yeasts that can trigger specific responses during fermentation due to their unique functionalities. This issue of the Winemaking update will focus on a new SIY designed for white and rosé wines.

Lallemand Winemaking Update #16 2011

Rosé Fermentation

In 2006, the world production of rosé wines was estimated at 21.5 million hL – 9% of the total world production of wine (Aigrain 2009). Production has been increasing for several years. In the United Kingdom, for example the main sellers are rosé wines from the United States – almost half of the total wines sold in supermarkets. From a technical point of view, the production of rosé wine involves particular considerations as rosé is mid-way between white wine (avoiding the extraction of phenolic compounds at the tannin level) and red wine (involving potential problems with colour extraction and structure). When short maceration times are used in the production of high quality rosé wines, the wines can be fragile and evolve rapidly. One of the most frequent developments is the appearance of premature lactic and creamy aromas that can override the fruity aromas in the nose and the refreshing sensation in retronasal perception. This issue of Winemaking Update focuses on some points to consider during fermentation - please click on the link to see the full articleWUP #2- 2012 Rosé Australie