Expertise documents

Co-Inoculation

Co-inoculation is the practice of inoculating selected wine bacteria at the beginning of the winemaking process shortly after yeast inoculation, usually 24 to 48 hours after yeast inoculation. This technique is advantageous because not only will it secure the malolactic fermentation (MLF), but also because there are definite advantages that are recognized by winemakers and professionals. For a successful co-inoculation, some parameters are crucial for its success – choosing the right wine yeast, correctly rehydrated, good temperature management and the proper yeast nutrition strategy are keys point to integrate for any fermentations. Well-fed and heathly wine yeast and bacteria leads to complete and regular alcoholic and malolactic fermentations Based on 20 years of experiences, and from the results of many collaborations between Lallemand and research center from France, Spain, Italie, South Africa, Argentina and Germany has shown the benefits of co-inoculation with either Oenococcus oeni or Lactobacillus plantarum. UI Bacteria #1 co inoculation Australia 2018

Managing oxidative risk with biological tools Post-fermentation with Pure-Lees™ Longevity

We have seen in Part I of Managing oxidative risk how to fight oxidation in must with specific inactivated yeast, such as Glutastar™. Even though the impact of Glutastar™ is evident all the way to the bottle, there are sensitive stages post fermentation, where oxygen contamination needs to be controlled via O2 scavenging in order to avoid wine oxidations. In the post-fermentation stages, the oxygen ingress can vary depending on the type of operation done with the wine. There are numerous time points when wine is potentially exposed to oxygen along the way to the bottling step, and beyond. Pure-Lees™ Longevity is a specific yeast derivatives with high potential to scavenge oxygen is a great biological tools to reduce the use of SO2 during critical points post-fermentation. WUP - Oxidation - Pure-Lees ENG

Managing oxidative risk with biological tools – Glutastar™ in Pre-fermentation

Throughout winemaking, several steps are known as strategic key points where oxidation mechanisms can occur: transport of grapes, at pressing, stabulation, racking, at the beginning of AF, during cold stabilization, storage and transport. This Winemaking Update will focus on biological tools available to winemakers to control oxidation prior to the onset of alcoholic fermentation, more specifically on how the specific yeast derivative, Glutastar™ can support the process of managing oxidation in white and rosé wines in a strategy to reduce chemical intrant such as SO2. WUP - Oxidation - Glutastar ENG  

Berry skin thickness: a Key factor for grapegrowers and winemakers

LalVigne under Investigation #2

Skin plays a fundamental role for the grape composition and wine quality along with the viticulture and winemaking processes, as they are the most important source of aroma and polyphenol compounds. Thickness is one of the most important grape skin morphological characteristics affecting the gas exchange regulation, berry susceptibility to fungal diseases and resistance to mechanical injuries. Skins and seeds parameters are crucial for a complete grape ripening that cannot be described solely by the berry pulp chemical parameters. These compounds from the solid parts may ripen differently when compared to pulp parameters and need to be extracted during the wine making process; the maceration stage is determinant in obtaining the secondary metabolites from skins and seeds, especially for red wine production. UI Vineyard Solution #2 2020  

Biological tools in the vineyard to improve varietal expression

LalVigne under Investigation #1

In the context of current viticulture, the change observed in the climatic records of the last decades, with the rise in temperatures and the unusual rainfall distribution, is challenging for wine growers and winemakers to getting balanced grapes and wines, as these changes are leading to growing differences between technological maturity and aromatic and phenolic maturations. In order to face these changes, wine growers try to apply agronomic practices that can counteract these effects. Often these practices are not selective and have unwanted effects on different parameters of production or quality of the grapes. UI Vineyard Solutions #1 2020