Expertise documents

expertise_documents

The New Winemaking Update – Organic Version: Copper sulfate use in organic vineyards – are wine yeast and bacteria affected by this fungicide?

In 2017, the organic vineyard areas had tripled in 10 years and approximately 5% of worldwide vineyards are now under organic certifications.  For organic growers, who cannot use other fungicide sprays, copper sulfate is still an effective tool against downy mildew. With the increased production of organic vineyards in the world, the use of this fungicide has also grown with the expansion of this type of farming. It is known that elevated concentrations of this metal can be toxic to yeasts and bacteria. Our results have shown that wine yeast and bacteria do not appear to be significantly affected by Cu concentrations higher than 15 mg/L, except in the case of malolactic fermentation in white wines, where concentration > 7.5 mg/L can impact the MLF. High pH and high Cu concentrations can impact wine yeast viability and lag phase. To read more about this topic, please consult our Winemaking Update - Organic Version WUP Organic 2020 Cu- ENG LR

ESL 2020 : Biological tools in winemaking adapting to a changing environment

The proceedings from the 2019 Entretiens Scientifiques Lallemand held in Weisbaden Germany are now available. the 2019 international meeting focused on different strategies to overcome some of the issues related to climate change. From the vineyards with Lalvigne foliar sprays to managing acidity with non-Saccharomyces yeast, to nutrition and oxidation management. Special guests from the Geisenheim Institute , Prof Manfred Grossman and Prof J. Wendland presented the latest work from the Institute. The Entretiens had the privilege of hosting Prof Monika Christmann from Geisenheim University and the OIV 1st Vice-President as the key note speaker. ESL 2019 eversion

Optimal wine yeast nutrition with Stimula Chardonnay™ for maximum aromatic expression in Chardonnay wines

Wine yeasts are able to produce volatile aroma compounds from precursors found in the grape musts. Despite this ability, the wine yeast needs an adapted nutrition management (type of nutrient and timing of addition) that will maximize this secondary metabolism. Work done in collaboration with INRA (Montpellier, France) has shown that the type of nutrient, and the timing of addition during alcoholic fermentation has an important impact on the production of fermentative aroma compounds. Stimula Chardonnay™ has been shown to maximize specific aroma compounds in Chardonnay wines UI Stimula Chardonnay 2019 ENG USA  

Optimal wine yeast nutrition with Stimula Chardonnay™ for maximum aromatic expression in Chardonnay wines

Wine yeasts are able to produce volatile aroma compounds from precursors found in the grape musts. Despite this ability, the wine yeast needs an adapted nutrition management (type of nutrient and timing of addition) that will maximize this secondary metabolism. Work done in collaboration with INRA (Montpellier, France) has shown that the type of nutrient, and the timing of addition during alcoholic fermentation has an important impact on the production of fermentative aroma compounds. Stimula Chardonnay™ has been shown to maximize specific aroma compounds in Chardonnay wines UI Stimula Chardonnay 2019 ENG USA

Co-inoculation of selected wine bacteria

The advantages of co-inoculation are numerous, such as ensuring a faster more secure process and reducing time for the MLF. Co-inoculation is an important modulator in sensory development, and it helps limit the development of spoilage microorganisms and thus limits off flavor compound productions.

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