Expertise documents

Managing oxidative risk with biological tools Post-fermentation with Pure-Lees™ Longevity

We have seen in Part I of Managing oxidative risk how to fight oxidation in must with specific inactivated yeast, such as Glutastar™. Even though the impact of Glutastar™ is evident all the way to the bottle, there are sensitive stages post fermentation, where oxygen contamination needs to be controlled via O2 scavenging in order to avoid wine oxidations. In the post-fermentation stages, the oxygen ingress can vary depending on the type of operation done with the wine. There are numerous time points when wine is potentially exposed to oxygen along the way to the bottling step, and beyond. Pure-Lees™ Longevity is a specific yeast derivatives with high potential to scavenge oxygen is a great biological tools to reduce the use of SO2 during critical points post-fermentation

Managing oxidative risk with biological tools – Glutastar™ in Pre-fermentation

Throughout winemaking, several steps are known as strategic key points where oxidation mechanisms can occur: transport of grapes, at pressing, stabulation, racking, at the beginning of AF, during cold stabilization, storage and transport. This Winemaking Update will focus on biological tools available to winemakers to control oxidation prior to the onset of alcoholic fermentation, more specifically on how the specific yeast derivative, Glutastar™ can support the process of managing oxidation in white and rosé wines in a strategy to reduce chemical intrant such as SO2.  

The New Winemaking Update – Organic Version: Copper sulfate use in organic vineyards – are wine yeast and bacteria affected by this fungicide?

In 2017, the organic vineyard areas had tripled in 10 years and approximately 5% of worldwide vineyards are now under organic certifications.  For organic growers, who cannot use other fungicide sprays, copper sulfate is still an effective tool against downy mildew. With the increased production of organic vineyards in the world, the use of this fungicide has also grown with the expansion of this type of farming. It is known that elevated concentrations of this metal can be toxic to yeasts and bacteria. Our results have shown that wine yeast and bacteria do not appear to be significantly affected by Cu concentrations higher than 15 mg/L, except in the case of malolactic fermentation in white wines, where concentration > 7.5 mg/L can impact the MLF. High pH and high Cu concentrations can impact wine yeast viability and lag phase. To read more about this topic, please consult our Winemaking Update - Organic Version WUP Organic 2020 Cu- ENG LR

Winemaking Update #1-2015 A new concept of selected Lactobacillus plantarum for high pH wines

The tendency to harvest higher maturity grapes, resulting in higher pH and alcohol wines, seems more favorable to the development of indigenous bacteria. To limit the development of unknown indigenous flora, which can lead to the production of undesirable sensory deviations, co-inoculation is an interesting winemaking option and using selected Lb. plantarum in the freeze-dried form for direct inoculation appears to be a very safe winemaking option in combination with the co-inoculation strategy. L. plantarum ML Prime™ offers several advantages: good implantation, fast, effective dominance in co-inoculation and very fast, complete MLF under high pH conditions. In addition, its facultative heterofermentative characteristics makes ML Prime™ a safe choice for preventing the formation of acetic acid (volatile acidity) from hexose sugars. For more information on this topic, WUP #1-2015 ML Prime - SK  

Winemaking Update- ML Prime

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