Expertise documents

expertise_documents

Biocontrol agents against Brettanomyces

The contaminating yeast Brettanomyces is a problem, notably for red wines. This yeast is very opportunistic and can survive and multiply in difficult conditions throughout the life of the wine. Hygienic conditions and microbiological controls can inhibit its growth, but will not eliminate it. The goal then is to limit its development, which will in turn limit the production of volatile phenols. The use of SO2 is the preferred method to control its development, however there is a recent trend to reduce the use of SO2 in wine, as well as a general increase in wine pH, which reduces its efficacy. Moreover, there is a great variability in the resistance of SO2 among different Brettanomyces yeasts. The inoculation with our selected natural bacteria is a good option to protect the wine during the fermentation process, and new studies also show their potential to protect wine during the ageing steps against Brettanomyces re-contamination UI #4 Biocontrol MLB ENG

2016 Proceedings of the Entretiens Scientifiques Lallemand

The proceedings of the 2016 Entretiens Scientifiques Lallemand are now available to download and consult. ESL 2016 Canada - ENG

SO2 Production by Wine Yeast

Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast, whether selected or spontaneous, will produce SO2. Wine yeasts are able to produce from a few mg/L of sulphites to more than 90 mg/L, depending on the fermentation conditions and the yeast strain. To know more about this character, please consult our Download PDF

Understanding varietal aromas during alcoholic and malolactic fermentations

Proceeding of the XXIVes Entretiens Scientifiques Lallemand - 'Understanding Varietal Aromas During Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermetnations'.  This booklet includes a presentation by  Dr Matthew Goddard, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand titled 'Merging Ecology of Wine Microbiology" Download PDF

Sensory Development of Cool Climate

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