Expertise documents

The Fermentation of Fructose in Winemaking

Glucose and fructose are the main fermentable sugars in wine must. During alcoholic fermentation, yeast convert most of the glucose and fructose present into alcohol and CO2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a glucophilic yeast, preferring glucose over fructose. This issue of 'The WiAbility of Wine Yeast to Consume Fructosene Expert' further explains this phenomenon.

The Use of Non-conventional Microorganisms in Winemaking

The proceedings from the XXIIIes Entretiens Scientifiques Lallemand, Monestier, France - 'The use of Non-conventional Microorganisms in Winemaking' ESL-2016-Canada-ENG

CO-INOCULATION OF SELECTED WINE BACTERIA

This Winemaking Expert explores the ever increasing practice of co-inoculation. In France and Spain for example, close to 50% of MLF is now done via co-inoculation. The advantages are numerous, such as ensuring a faster more secure process and reducing time for the MLF. Co-inoculation is an important modulator in sensory development, and it helps limit the development of spoilage microorganisms and thus limits off flavor compound productions. For example, a wine bacteria like the Enoferm Beta can produce higher levels of diacetyl during sequential inoculation. Co-inoculation on the other hand, will reduce the production of diacetyl and consequently reinforces the fruity character of white wines. Timing of inoculation, interaction with yeast, the presence of precursors that promote the production of aromatic molecules, pH and temperature conditions are all criteria that modulate aromatic expression in wines. Choosing a wine bacteria has become a parameter to take into consideration for developing a specific wine profile.WE4 South Africa

More acidity, more balance with the new IONYS™ wine yeast

IONYS HRThe new wine yeast IONYS™ is the first wine yeast that has been selected within the Saccharomyces cerevisiæ species for its capacity to significantly and naturally acidify must during fermentation and have a lower sugar to alcohol conversion ratio. It is an ideal yeast for red wine and to tackle the problem of wines affected by global warming.

Wine bacteria to control volatile phenols from Brettanomyces

This issue of the Winemaking Update explores a natural way to control Brettanomyces yeast and the volatile phenols they produce, with selected wine bacteria used to conduct malolactic fermentation.WUP #2 2014 South Africa
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